6.10.2014

nick's jeans

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This is Nick doing his best Bruce Springsteen impression... *swoon*
Alternate post title: How To Objectify Your Man.

Hi there! I hope you guys aren't sick of looking at jeans yet, because (un)fortunately for you, I'm not sick of making them! I figured since I  got some good jeans-sewing-momentum going with my last pair, I might as well take advantage of it and make good on a promise to Nick to sew him a pair, too.

Now, I don't need to explain my selfish-seamstress ways to ya'll - I know I'm in good company here! But, this past Christmas I bought Nick all the goods - denim, thread, buttons, rivets - for me to make him his very own pair of jeans. And then proceeded to not make him jeans for the next six months! Seriously, I am the worst gift-giver in the history of ever. The fact that I made myself a pair of jeans before his... well... I was starting to feel like if I didn't get on it soon it would just end up being one of those things that gets brought up 20 years from now in an argument ("yeah, like that time you said you were going to make me jeans...") And really, it's not completely unselfish sewing - brownie points with your husband never hurt anything!

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But the jeans! The jeaannnnssss!!! I made Nick a pair of pants back in November using the Jedediah pants pattern from Thread Theory with the intention of using them as a wearable muslin for a jeans pattern. We discussed a few changes he wanted - like a smaller back yoke and higher back pockets, and I felt confident that I could adjust the pattern to make it more of a jeans style, which mainly meant changing the shape of the front pockets. However when I went hunting for denim, I really decided that only selvedge denim would do for my guy.  I bought the 13.5 oz Cone Mills Selvedge Denim from Taylor Tailor's Supply shop (love that guy!) I love the look of a classic, no-nonsense jean on a man - and it's really Nick's style, too (go figure). I felt like selvedge denim would make a great classic looking jean, but still give that extra special little 'something'.

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However, that presented a bit of a problem.  If you're unfamiliar with selvedge denim jeans, typically the selvedge - which usually has a contrasting color (this denim has a white and red line) - is used for the out-seam of the leg, which means that the pattern must be completely straight along the out-seam. This meant that I was going to have to make some much larger alterations to the Jedediah pattern, and, truth be told, was one of the main reasons I procrastinated on this for so long. I was really worried that shifting the pattern that much would cause the pants to fall weird. However, I bit the bullet and just decided what the hell, and gave it a go! And it worked out, so phew!

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(Apologies for the nasty carpet in my sewing room... I swear it's clean, just old) Hopefully you can see in these photos the difference between the original Jedediah pants pattern on the left, and the altered "Jedediah Selvedge Jeans" pattern on the right. Basically, I measured the distance between the new, straight, out-seam and the original, curved, out-seam at different key points along the length of the leg (high hip, low hip, crotch, thigh, knee, etc.) and shifted the inseam over the corresponding amount.  You can also see how much I changed the yoke piece, too. I measured an old pair of Nick's jeans to get this shape, then transferred the amount I cut off of the yoke to the top of the pants backs.

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I may have taken a smidgen of width out of the hip/butt area while making all these adjustments, but I swear it was for a good reason! I felt like after wearing, Nick's Jedediah khaki's tend to get a very saggy seat and I thought that might help solve the problem. But I think instead it just made the jeans tight in allll the right places!! Bwahahahaha! Accidental WIN for this lucky lady!

While I don't know that this iteration is Nick's 'perfect jeans pattern', I actually really love the way they turned out. Next time (ha!) I would like to take a bit of width out of the waist in the back because I think that might actually be the cause of the saggy seat. And I might consider taking a tiny bit of width out of the legs, although Nick is pretty happy with the way the legs fit as is.

But let's take a look at some of the details, because with jeans, it's alllll about the details!

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I stole a lof of ideas for these from Taylor Tailor's totally drool-worthy jeans. Here you can see the coin pocket which uses the selvedge edge as a nice design feature. Also prominent in this photo is some of my less-than-perfect topstitching! I was really worried about sewing such thick denim on my conventional sewing machine (an older model Singer HD) but it actually handled it like a champ through most of the process - until I got to the belt loops... oy vey. My machine doesn't love belt loops on a good day, but it was just not. happening. with these! I ended up forgoing my usual bartack method for the belt loops and instead just did a few rows of straight stitching. We'll see how well they hold up.

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For the back pockets I copied an old pair of Nick's jeans. Everything that could be sewn with a flat-felled seam was sewn with a flat-felled seam. Including the back rise and yokes, which results in a charmingly, slightly off 'v' where the two yokes meet.

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If love were a seam, it would be 72 inches of painstakingly, hand rolled, flat-felled inseam!

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And, oddly enough, one of my favorite details is this little cobalt blue buttonhole!

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I gave Nick strict instructions to limit the amount of washing he gives these jeans. Indigo dyed, 100% cotton denim like this is known for it's ability to break in and 'mold' to the wearer, creating beautiful fades with time. I'm actually quite smitten with these jeans, to be honest! So smitten that I'm itching to make myself a pair, too! But don't worry, I'll take a jeans-sewing break for now and make something else for a bit to end the denim monotony that's been going on around these parts!

And now, because it's my blog and I say so...

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Let's take one last look at that tush!!

Seriously... dude butts do not get enough screen time on this blog!

xx

51 comments:

  1. Definitely one of the more informative blog posts I've seen in a while! I'm curious about why selvedge denim jeans use a straight side seam, but more importantly if there's any sacrifice to the fit as a result. Also, 6 months is pretty good as far as procrastination goes, I still have leather that I was supposed to use to make my husband a leather jacket from 2012.

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  2. Wow! These look awesome! All the work you put into these really shows, they look very professional (and really, six months isn't very long for something to sit on the To Do list in my opinion :P). I'm glad you stuck it out with the Jeds pattern - with your careful changes and attention to detail, every pair you make will just keep getting closer and closer to Nick's version of pants perfection :).

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  3. Nice! I always wondered how the sides are done with selvage... These look terrific!

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  4. These look so good! I loved the Bruce Springsteen pose at the beginning. Your jeans making skills are so good!
    My boyfriend also had to wait for a very long time (still uses it: "as if you are going to make garment x before 2015") so I get the waiting thing.

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  5. Ooh these are awesome! Since last year I already have all the supplies to make a pair of selvedge jeans for my husband but I'm just too scared to make alterations to his usual jeans pattern. I should bite the bullet after reading your post!

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  6. These are so great!! The topstitching looks awesome and I bet they'll wear in a treat. You've just reminded me that I bought that pattern with the intention of making something for my boy...quite some time ago!

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  7. Dayum, dat ass. And even more dayum, dat selvedge. You are the most glorious, hilarious, and talented woman in the world. It has been decided.

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  8. Wow you are the best wife! These jeans look perfect and seriously - flat fell seaming!! I don't even do that for my jeans! You deserve to make at least 3 really simple easy tank tops or tees after this effort!

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  9. Too right you should be smitten with these! You are one incredibly talented lady.

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  10. Geez, these are one good looking pair of jeans. That denim is just gorgeous. I love it when you make jeans, you are just so good and the fact that you love them really comes through.

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  11. Amazing job on these jeans. The fit, details and style are all perfect, great job.

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  12. it's so funny, sallie, i got caught up admiring the rear view - and then you wrote, "I may have taken a smidgen of width out of the hip/butt area
    while making all these adjustments, but I swear it was for a good
    reason!" and i was all, DAMN RIGHT for a good reason! that man of yours has some great, erm, assets.

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  13. Oh, dear, it's been two years since I promised Blake a pair of jeans, ack! These look GREAT! I need to conquer my fear and just get stitching. Your topstitching is droolworthy and your fella looks hunky as all get out in these! Now I have "Dancing in the Dark" stuck in my head...

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  14. okay my brain starts to hurt on jeans construction, so i'll head straight to objectifying your HOTTIE. he looks amazing in those stupefying jeans! and the addition of a leash only makes it moreso.

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  15. I have a pair of Jedediah jeans on my to-do list. I hope against hope mine turn out as good as these. Am making notes about the butt alterations! ;-D

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  16. I think your denim jean posts are very inspiring. Someday I am going to be jeans stitcher too!

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  17. Hey Hannah! I think originally jeans manufacturers used selvedge denim with the straight side seam to conserve fabric, and it also saves a step in the sewing process - you don't have to finish the side seam, so it's just one set of stitching. It also adds a bit of visual interest to the inside, which is nice if you want to turn up your hem. I think denim enthusiasts nowadays have really fetishized the selvedge so it's become a symbol of jeans made the 'old fashioned' way. It definitely changes the fit of the jeans. When you lay the jeans flat, the legs splay away from each other, giving the jeans a 'bow legged' look. Which means that when they're worn, they wrinkle in places, and over time create the faded areas that people love about vintage jeans, like 'whiskering' at the center front.

    Personally, it was never something I went nuts for, but after making this pair I'm pretty impressed with the quality of the denim, and the selvedge is so pretty it seems a shame to cut it off!

    And I would DEFINITELY be procrastinating if my husband asked me to make him a leather jacket!!

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  18. Yay, well done! I'd never thought about how making selvedge jeans affected the leg shape - wild! I'd be curious if the model noticed any change in fit or how they felt. I have a pair of (non-selvedge) jeans all cut out for my husband and am feeling inspired.

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  19. You are too cute! Great job on these jeans! I promised my husband jeans back during MPB's jeans sew-along. I got distracted, and years have since passed. You're showing us all up!! :)

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  20. Thanks!! I don't think Nick noticed anything, he mostly was like, "These are great! They look and feel like jeans!" Haha! I think I was WAY more worried about how it changed the leg shape than he was! Sewing jeans for dudes is kinda fun! Can't wait to see the jeans you're making for your guy!

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  21. Oh thanks Maria! Definitely, definitely give it a go!

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  22. hahaha!! Yes, sneaky butt alterations are a MUST!

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  23. Haha!! Thanks Oona! When Nick saw these pictures he was like "I wish I wasn't holding a leash in all of these, I look stupid." At least Lucille deigned to make an appearance in ONE of the pictures so it doesn't entirely look like I'm keeping him on a leash!

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  24. So glad I could oblige with the Bruce soundtrack to your day!!

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  25. YES!! Yes he does!! Hahaha!! He'll LOVE that you said that!
    It actually poses a bit of a sewing/pattern alteration conundrum. They just don't make men's patterns to accommodate Nick's level of ASSets!

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  26. Thanks Lori!

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  27. Thanks Novita! I remember the jeans you made for your husband - they looked INCREDIBLE!! I spent a lot of time searching google for images of selvedge denim patterns before I finally bit the bullet and made the adjustments to his pattern. It really wasn't difficult, but I was worried that it would look really weird! But I think it turned out fine.

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  28. Thanks! I love the Jedediah pattern, it's proven to be a great starting point for pants for Nick!

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  29. Thanks Meg! Yeah, I spent A LOT of time on google before I went ahead and adjusted the pattern!

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  30. I love the Bruce Springsteen pose too ;)
    Thanks Hanne!

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  31. You are a good wife, I promised my hubs some pajama pants a year ago and still haven't made them, eek! These jeans look so professional, it will be fun to watch as they get some wear and fading, they will look even better as they age! You are definitely a jeans inspiration :)

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  32. the pattern adjustments to use the selvage denim is fascinating! never would have thought you could just transfer all that shaping (haha i use the term shaping loosely, considering: men don't have hips) to the inseam successfully. fantastic job, as always!

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  33. Fantastic! He is a lucky guy!

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  34. Man those jeans are awesome! Total selfless sewing and massive brownie points for you, especially with how well they turned out. Love the top stitching and all tho see flat felled seams. ....

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  35. Aww! Thanks Bobby! I think he knows ;)

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  36. Yeah I never would have thought that it would work either! But from what I could glean from the internet that seems to be the way it's done. Weird, huh?

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  37. Thanks Debbie! That inseam was seriously like the flat felled seam that wouldn't end!

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  38. Thanks Kelly! Yeah, I'm excited to see them age, too. We're going to try the whole 'freezer cleaning' method with them to let them fade naturally from wear - Should be fun!

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  39. Great job! Jeans are one thing I'll never have to make for my hubby--cowboy cut Wrangler's mold perfectly to his ASSets, so I just let them do that for me. ;-) And I do a fair amount of selfless sewing, but I think you win on this one...jeans are just SO. MUCH. work. :-)

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  40. These jeans came out great. Loving all the details on it.
    Don't feel bad, my friend has been waiting for his coat for several years now. D'oh!

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  41. So I had to read this piecemeal whilst the hubster wasn't looking... because I've been promising to make him jeans for aaages. And i have the exact same red selvedge denim from Taylor Tailor too. So you're way ahead of me in the partner brownie points schedule! Nice work Sallie! :)

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  42. Sallie, I already nagged Morgan to do a selvedge jeans pattern. I want to zoom in on Guillaume's butt too. THE INTERNET DESERVES IT.

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  43. Hi Nick Tush. Looking pretty good ol' fella!

    These rule. I love selvedge jeans (I just found a couple of total denim nerd blogs which are basically denim porn) and I love seeing how they age as you wear them. I know we've talked about this before, but I wonder how selvedge jeans look on girls... I'm so used to wearing skintight stretch ones - it would be interesting to try a more boyfriend style.

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  44. I'm already scheming on my own pair - I'm just too much of a jeans fan to NOT give it a try! I feel pretty confident about this pattern hack, I might take the same approach with my BBW pattern and see how it fares.

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  45. Taylor HackbarthJune 15, 2014 at 6:23 AM

    These jeans turned out amazing! Great job with all of the details. I do the same thing with belt loops on heavy fabric like this denim, ditch the bartacks and sew several rows of straight stitches. Thanks for the links!

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  46. Hi Sallie, what is your email address please? I work for www.fabrics-store.com and we would like to propose a collaboration for you. Please email me on maskar@gmail.com. Thank you, Masha.

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  47. You are the best wife EVER - I hope Nick knows that LOL. Love IS miles of flat-felled seams - that's a lot of love right there!! These jeans are fabulous, and Nick's modelling skills are top-shelf... handsome fella! :)

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  48. great work! and i vote for more dude tush pics on every blog!
    i really admire all the jeans you've made! all those little details are just amazing (and no way in hell i'm ever making a pair of jeans in my life.. i just don't have that kind of patience)

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  49. Hey Sallie, you have shared a fabulous blog post with lovely pictures to back your data. I loved the design of the jeans. I am sure this jeans will easily make a fashion statement. Thanks for sharing the valuable information with us. Hope you design many more jeans trousers for the fashion industry to boast of.

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